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Dutch Corporate Tax Reform: Dividend Tax Remains, A.T.A.D. Arrives, and Tax Rates Drop

Dutch Corporate Tax Reform: Dividend Tax Remains, A.T.A.D. Arrives, and Tax Rates Drop

Across the globe, the landscape for international tax is in a constant state of change. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Netherlands. On the third Tuesday of September, a repeal of the dividend withholding tax was announced. Within a month, it was withdrawn. Paul Kraan, a partner of Van Campen Liem in Amsterdam, discusses the remaining tax proposals presented by the Dutch government on the eve of the third Tuesday of September. These include provisions related to A.T.A.D. 1, such as G.A.A.R., an exit tax for corporations, a C.F.C. anti-abuse rule, and a cap on the deductibility of net interest expense.  Also discussed is an existing unilateral exemption from withholding tax on cross-border dividend payments in (i) the context of an income tax treaty and (ii) the presence of economic substance for the direct or indirect shareholder. This exemption is likely to remain in the law.

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Hybrid Mismatches: Where U.S. Tax Law and A.T.A.D. Meet

Hybrid Mismatches: Where U.S. Tax Law and A.T.A.D. Meet

When U.S. tax planners attend foreign conferences, it is not uncommon to hear pointed barbs that the U.S. is an outlier when it comes to rules enforcing “best practices” on global business transactions. However, when it comes to reverse hybrids and hybrid mismatches, the rules are not all that different on both sides of the Atlantic. Fanny Karaman and Beate Erwin compare approaches taken by ATAD 2 with U.S. tax law after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

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The Opportunity Zone Tax Benefit – How Does it Work and Can Foreign Investors Benefit?

The Opportunity Zone Tax Benefit – How Does it Work and Can Foreign Investors Benefit?

State Aid to entice investment and development in a specific region is bad in Europe but encouraged in the U.S. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act added an important new provision that is expected to unlock unrealized gains and defer the tax on the gain when it is invested in active operating businesses in distressed areas designated as “Opportunity Zones.” The tax is deferred until the targeted investment is sold, or until 2026 at the latest. A progressive partial step-up in basis is also granted if the investment is held for a minimum of five years. The entire appreciation in value of the new targeted investment is excluded from tax if held for ten years. In a plain English primer, Galia Antebi and Nina Krauthamer explain the concept and the necessary implementation steps and consider whether the new provision can eliminate F.I.R.P.T.A. tax for foreign investors.

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F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

When F.A.T.C.A. was adopted in 2010, the hoopla from the U.S. Senate promoted the idea that the I.R.S. would become invincible in rooting out recalcitrant Americans not wanting to pay tax and the financial institutions willing to assist them. In principle, information in U.S. tax returns could be compared with F.A.T.C.A. reporting by foreign financial institutions to identify which taxpayers remained offside and which banks had insufficient reporting systems. A recent report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (“T.I.G.T.A.”) concluded that after spending nearly $380 million, the I.R.S. is still not prepared to enforce F.A.T.C.A. compliance. In their article, Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer summarize the principal shortfalls and possible solutions identified by T.I.G.T.A. and which suggested action plans the I.R.S. will contemplate.

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Tax Considerations of I.P. When Expanding a Business Offshore

Tax Considerations of I.P. When Expanding a Business Offshore

If a client asks a U.S. tax adviser about the U.S. tax cost of contributing intangible property (“I.P.”) to a foreign corporation for use in an active business, the response can be a dizzying array of bad tax consequences beginning with a deemed sale in a transaction that results in an ongoing income stream. While that is a correct answer, it need not be the only answer. Elizabeth V. Zanet and Stanley C. Ruchelman explore alternatives to a capital contribution of I.P. to a foreign corporation, including (i) the use of a foreign hybrid entity and (ii) licensing the I.P. to a foreign entity in order to benefit from the F.D.I.I. tax deduction. Each alternative may provide interesting tax results, but attention to detail will be required.

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