HIDE

Other Publications

Insights

Publications

Insights Vol. 6 No. 1: Updates & Other Tidbits

Insights Vol. 6 No. 1: Updates & Other Tidbits

This month, Rusudan Shervashidze and Stanley C. Ruchelman look at several interesting items, including (i) the publication of draft legislation by the Crown Dependencies of Guernsey, Jersey, and Isle of Man calling for the existence of economic substance for resident companies engaged in certain businesses and defining what that means, (ii) the denial of benefits incident to foreign earned income for a military contractor in Afghanistan who maintained a place of abode in the U.S., (iii) an increase in fees charged by the I.R.S. to issue residency certificates, (iv) the establishment of a working group to combat transnational tax crime through increased enforcement collaboration among tax authorities in several countries, and (v) changes to China’s residency rules and the sharing of taxpayer financial information under C.R.S. 

Read More

Spontaneous Exchange of Tax Rulings – The Swiss Angle

Spontaneous Exchange of Tax Rulings – The Swiss Angle

Most – but not all – global tax advisers know that the tax planning universe has changed.  The few holdouts hoping that the old ways may yet be available were disappointed, again, when Switzerland announced procedures for the spontaneous exchange of tax rulings.  Rulings issued on and after January 1, 2010, will be exchanged beginning January 1, 2018.  Michael Fischer and Marc Buchmann of Attorneys Fischer Ramp Partner AG, Zurich, explain the new procedures and how taxpayers may take steps to stop the spontaneous exchange of existing rulings.

Read More

Insights Vol. 4 No. 6: Updates and Tidbits

This month, Beate Erwin, Astrid Champion, and Nina Krauthamer look briefly at several timely issues, including (i) the return of foreign certified acceptance agents to the passport certification process in connection with the issuance of U.S. I.T.I.N.’s, (ii) the effect of the French election on French tax reform proposals, and (iii) demands for the U.S. to provide the same type of information as is supplied to I.G.A. partner countries.

Read More

I.R.S. Information Exchanges & the Coordinated Tax Raids on Credit Suisse

I.R.S. Information Exchanges & the Coordinated Tax Raids on Credit Suisse

In April, coordinated tax raids targeted three separate offices Credit Suisse involved in tax fraud examinations by the Netherlands, France, Germany, the U.K., and Australia.  Was it merely a coincidence that these are countries with which the U.S. regularly cooperates in the exchange of tax information?  Rusudan Shervashidze and Stanley C. Ruchelman discuss the many avenues through which the I.R.S. furnishes and receives information.  One thing is clear: The I.R.S. had the means to transfer information to the relevant tax authorities.

Read More

E.U. Data Protection and the Fight Against Tax Evasion: A Delicate Balance

E.U. Data Protection and the Fight Against Tax Evasion: A Delicate Balance

The tax world has seen an important shift in global policies, with an emphasis on tax transparency and exchange of information.  The transparency measures are contained in tax-driven and non-tax-driven legislation, and while the goals of the legislation may be lofty, the policies may violate fundamental individual rights, including data protection.  Fanny Karaman and Astrid Champion examine the E.U.’s non-fiscally-driven approach to tax transparency and, more precisely, the legal limits of such transparency as evidenced in recent cases.

Read More

Country-by-Country Reporting – Where Are We Going?

B.E.P.S. Action 13 addresses country-by-country reporting among tax authorities as a means of ferreting out mismatches between functions and profits. Now, CbC reporting is morphing in Europe to a public disclosure tool to bring N.G.O.’s into the process. Your tax savings through planning becomes a global problem for the N.G.O.’s to redress through public outcry. Michael Peggs and Kenneth Lobo tell all.

Read More

Exchange of Information: Israel Inches Toward International Norms

The State of Israel depends on immigration for growth in population and capital. Favorable tax rules and confidentiality rules are key pillars of the policy to promote immigration. In a world that is obsessed with B.E.P.S., Israeli policy towards confidentiality is experiencing change. Boaz Feinberg and Ofir Paz of ZAG-S&W, Tel Aviv discuss the scope of that change.

Read More

I.R.S. Adopts O.E.C.D. Standard in New CbC Reporting Regulations

I.R.S. Adopts O.E.C.D. Standard in New CbC Reporting Regulations

In December, the I.R.S. released Prop. Treas. Reg. §1.60384 -15, which details the country-by-country (CbC) reporting that will be required of large U.S.-based business entities. The proposed regulations define the persons required to file the CbC report, companies that are to included in the report, information that must be reported, acceptable measurement methodologies to be used, and uses to which data may be put.

These regulations closely follow the model recommended by the O.E.C.D. B.E.P.S. report. Sheryl Shah and Stanley C. Ruchelman explain the I.R.S.’s reasons and request for input regarding national security exemptions not otherwise considered by the O.E.C.D.

Read More

The Transparent World: Exchange of Information Has Begun & Pacts to Assist Implementation Have Been Signed

Despite efforts to repeal F.A.T.C.A. in the U.S. and opposition from abroad, it appears that F.A.T.C.A. is here to stay. Galia Antebi and Philip R. Hirschfeld address the recent September 30 milestone and the advent of exchanges of financial account information with tax administrations of I.G.A. partner jurisdictions.

Read More

Insights Vol. 2 No. 4: F.A.T.C.A. 24/7

Read Publication

POTENTIAL DISAGREEMENT BETWEEN THE U.S. AND I.G.A. JURISDICTIONS ON HOW TO TREAT NEW INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTS

Based on the answer to Question 10 under the “General Compliance” heading of the I.R.S.’s F.A.T.C.A. Frequently Asked Questions And Answers webpage, the I.R.S. requires that financial institutions in I.G.A. countries refuse to open new individual accounts if they cannot obtain a Form W-8BEN or a self-certification from the account holder. Conversely, the governments of both the U.K. and Canada have taken the position that under their I.G.A.’s, resident F.F.I.’s can open new individual accounts without self-certifications as long as the accounts are treated as reportable accounts.

In a letter to the Treasury Department released on March 27, the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (“S.I.F.M.A.”) pointed to this potential disagreement as having inconsistent guidance coming out of the U.S. and other I.G.A. countries. Such inconsistency may hurt American banks with foreign operations. These banks will be placed at a disadvantage if they follow U.S. authority while their competition is allowed to follow less restrictive rules. S.I.F.M.A. does not take a position as to who is right in the disagreement, but expressed their concern about this dispute and the lack of any information on this and similar disputes over the meaning of important I.G.A. terms that will need to be resolved in the future.

I.R.S. TO PUBLISH TECHNICAL EXAMPLE DEMONSTRATING EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION

F.A.T.C.A. reports are to be submitted to the International Data Exchange Service (“I.D.E.S.”), which is a secure managed file transfer system that only accepts encrypted transmissions. The I.R.S. announced on March 2 that the I.D.E.S. gateway had been opened for countries and financial institutions to begin transmitting data.

The I.R.S. posted on a service called GitHub a new example showing F.F.I.’s how to create “data packets” of taxpayer account information to transmit using the I.D.E.S. The example also shows how to decrypt a notification.

GitHub is an open source repository hosting service that allows users to collaborate and share code and content. The I.R.S. has made it clear that they do not endorse any commercial product.

Insights Vol. 1 No. 10: Updates & Other Tidbits

Read Publication

ISRAEL ANNOUNCES ADOPTION OF O.E.C.D.’S COMMON REPORTING STANDARD

Israel has announced that it will adopt the Standard for Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information: Common Reporting Standard (“C.R.S.”) issued by the O.E.C.D. in February 2013.

The C.R.S. establishes a standardized form that banks and other financial institutions would be required to use in gathering account and transaction information for submission to domestic tax authorities. The information would be provided to domestic authorities on an annual basis for automatic exchange with other participating jurisdictions. The C.R.S. will focus on accounts and transactions of residents of a specific country, regardless of nationality. The C.R.S. also contains the due diligence and reporting procedures to be followed by financial institutions based on a Model 1 F.A.T.C.A. intergovernmental agreement (“I.G.A.”).

At the conclusion of the October 28-29 O.E.C.D. Forum on Transparency and Exchange of Information for Tax Purposes, about 50 jurisdictions had signed the document. The U.S. was notably absent as a signatory to the agreement. In addition to the C.R.S., the signed agreement contains a model competent authority agreement for jurisdictions that would like to participate at a later stage.

Exchanges of Information: What Does the IRS Receive? With Whom Does the IRS Speak?

Published in Intertax, Volume 42, Issue 8&9: August 2014.

Read More

Exchange of Information

Step 2002 National Conference.

Read More