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Missed Opportunities – Tax Court Shows No Mercy for Indirect Partner

Missed Opportunities – Tax Court Shows No Mercy for Indirect Partner

In the U.S., there are several options to challenge an I.R.S. adjustment in the courts, including the U.S. District Court, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Tax Court.  Of the three options, only a challenge in the Tax Court can be pursued without first paying the tax.  Strict time limits are placed on filing a petition to the Tax Court.  If a taxpayer misses the deadline, it must first pay the tax and then sue for refund in either of the other courts.  The petition deadline is easy to determine when the I.R.S. proposes an adjustment to an individual or corporation, but when the adjustment is made to the income of a partnership – which yields tax exposure for partners – it is not always clear when the time limit has run out.  In a recent memorandum decision, the Tax Court ruled that an indirect partner was not able to challenge the tax liability of a partnership because the petition came too late.  In their review of the decision, Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain the strange facts involved and point out that the taxpayer did not have “clean hands.”

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New York State Renews the Three-Year Clawback for Gifts

New York State Renews the Three-Year Clawback for Gifts

Generally, Federal estate and gift taxes are imposed on a person’s right to transfer property to another person during life or upon death.  State rules may differ from the Federal regime, imposing either an estate tax, inheritance tax, or gift tax or some combination of these taxes.  New York State limits its taxation to an estate tax on the transfer of property at the time of death.  There is no gift or inheritance tax.  But, as of April 1, 2014, gifts made by a N.Y. resident between April 1, 2014, and December 31, 2018, were clawed back into the taxable estate if the gifts were made within three years of death.  The clawback has been extended to cover gifts made through December 31, 2025.  Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain.

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State and Local Tax Credit Programs – Businesses May Get What Individuals Cannot

State and Local Tax Credit Programs – Businesses May Get What Individuals Cannot

Since recent Federal tax law changes have capped the state and local tax deduction for individuals to $10,000, many states have been trying to implement solutions to help alleviate the effects of the change.  New York State has introduced two programs to get around the $10,000 limitation:  New Yorkers can make payments to state charitable programs and receive a credit against N.Y. income tax or, alternatively, use an Employer Compensation Expense Program. Nina Krauthamer and Rusudan Shervashidze look at the back and forth between N.Y. and Federal regulators.

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New Jersey Provides G.I.L.T.I Guidance

New Jersey Provides G.I.L.T.I Guidance

Federal tax law has introduced a new type of gross income: Global Intangible Low Tax Income (“G.I.L.T.I.”).  The provisions are designed to stop U.S. companies from shifting their profits to offshore jurisdictions, and states are given a choice to incorporate parts of Federal law in one of three ways.  New Jersey has chosen “selective conformity.”  Nina Krauthamer and Rusudan Shervashidze explain what this means for the state and for taxpayers.

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F.B.A.R.’s — What You Need to Know

F.B.A.R.’s — What You Need to Know

April 15 is almost here, and while most people know this date as the filing deadline for individual tax returns, it is important to another filing requirement: the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (“F.B.A.R.”).  Although the form has been around since the 1970’s, many people continue to profess ignorance of  its existence.  Others are simply confused about the requirements.  A recent Federal case illustrates the perils of failing to file a required F.B.A.R.  Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain that penalties are high, and courts are skeptical about claims of ignorance of the law, especially when taxpayers have accumulated several million dollars placed in an offshore account.

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