HIDE

Other Publications

Insights

Publications

Peeling the Onion to Allocate Subpart F Income – This Will Make You Cry!

Peeling the Onion to Allocate Subpart F Income – This Will Make You Cry!

When Congress expanded the definition of a “U.S. Shareholder” in the T.C.J.A. by requiring the measurement of value as an alternative to voting power, it opened a Pandora’s box of issues.  First, more U.S. Persons became U.S. Shareholders.  Second, it imposed a difficult task for shareholders and corporations to measure relative value of all classes of shares and all holdings of shareholders.  Finally, many plans based on the existence of direct or direct or indirect dividend rights of foreign shareholders were shut down. Proposed regulations will modify the way Subpart F Income is allocated to various classes of shares having discretionary dividend rights. Neha Rastogi and Stanley C. Ruchelman explain the broadened scope of income inclusions under Subpart F.

Read More

Missed Opportunities – Tax Court Shows No Mercy for Indirect Partner

Missed Opportunities – Tax Court Shows No Mercy for Indirect Partner

In the U.S., there are several options to challenge an I.R.S. adjustment in the courts, including the U.S. District Court, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, and the U.S. Tax Court.  Of the three options, only a challenge in the Tax Court can be pursued without first paying the tax.  Strict time limits are placed on filing a petition to the Tax Court.  If a taxpayer misses the deadline, it must first pay the tax and then sue for refund in either of the other courts.  The petition deadline is easy to determine when the I.R.S. proposes an adjustment to an individual or corporation, but when the adjustment is made to the income of a partnership – which yields tax exposure for partners – it is not always clear when the time limit has run out.  In a recent memorandum decision, the Tax Court ruled that an indirect partner was not able to challenge the tax liability of a partnership because the petition came too late.  In their review of the decision, Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain the strange facts involved and point out that the taxpayer did not have “clean hands.”

Read More

Corporate Matters: Delaware Law Allows L.L.C. Divisions

Corporate Matters: Delaware Law Allows L.L.C. Divisions

Delaware recently amended its company law to enable a limited liability company (“L.L.C.”) to be divided into two or more newly-formed L.L.C.’s, with the original company either continuing or terminating its existence.  The amendment provides L.L.C. members with significant flexibility in separating from each other so that assets, liabilities, rights, and duties of the company can be allocated among the resulting companies.  Simon Prisk explains the change in company law.

Read More

New York State Renews the Three-Year Clawback for Gifts

New York State Renews the Three-Year Clawback for Gifts

Generally, Federal estate and gift taxes are imposed on a person’s right to transfer property to another person during life or upon death.  State rules may differ from the Federal regime, imposing either an estate tax, inheritance tax, or gift tax or some combination of these taxes.  New York State limits its taxation to an estate tax on the transfer of property at the time of death.  There is no gift or inheritance tax.  But, as of April 1, 2014, gifts made by a N.Y. resident between April 1, 2014, and December 31, 2018, were clawed back into the taxable estate if the gifts were made within three years of death.  The clawback has been extended to cover gifts made through December 31, 2025.  Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain.

Read More

New York State Says No to Annual Pied-A-Terre Tax, Yes to Increased Real Estate Transfer Taxes

New York State Says No to Annual Pied-A-Terre Tax, Yes to Increased Real Estate Transfer Taxes

As part of New York State’s annual budget process, law makers proposed an annual pied-à-terre tax on homes worth $5 million or more that do not serve as the buyer’s primary residence.  At the last minute, the tax was dropped and replaced by a 0.25 percentage point increase to the real estate transfer tax on sellers and a new graduated mansion tax, a special transfer tax imposed on purchasers.  Nina Krauthamer addresses the ins and outs of both taxes.

Read More

Austria, France, and Italy to Introduce Digital Services Taxes

Austria, France, and Italy to Introduce Digital Services Taxes

A limerick that is popular among members of the U.S. Congressional tax writing committees sheds wisdom on the development of tax policy:  “Don’t tax you.  Don’t tax me.  Tax the person behind the tree.”  Several countries in Europe have taken the rhyme to heart in developing unilateral digital services taxes designed to impose tax on extra-territorial activity of out-of-country companies.  The issue, as Austria, France, and Italy see it, is that these companies make huge profits in Europe but pay no tax there, while payments for digital services are often tax deductible in the countries where the services are used.  According to proponents such as Austria, it is only fair to tax those profits on a destination basis.  Benjamin Twardosz of CHSH Attorneys-at-Law, Vienna, explains the various proposals under consideration.

Read More

Foreign Investment in U.S. Real Estate – A F.I.R.P.T.A. Introduction

Foreign Investment in U.S. Real Estate – A F.I.R.P.T.A. Introduction

Many economic, political, and cultural factors make U.S. real estate an attractive investment for high net worth individuals resident in other countries.  These factors are supported by a set of straightforward tax rules that apply at the time of sale.  Alicea Castellanos, the C.E.O. and Founder of Global Taxes L.L.C., looks at the U.S. Federal income taxes and reporting obligations that apply to a foreign investor from the time U.S. real property is acquired to the time of its sale.

Read More

The Impact of Brexit on German Taxes for Private Clients and Nonprofit Organizations

The Impact of Brexit on German Taxes for Private Clients and Nonprofit Organizations

American business executives responsible for regional operations in Europe often see different approaches to problem solving in terms of cultural differences between various European countries.  It can be said that British colleagues often continue to rethink decisions even after solutions are adopted, and German colleagues focus on engineering a unified approach to reach the best solution to the matter at hand.  These cultural characteristics seem to have manifested in the different ways Parliament in the U.K. and the Bundestag in Germany are addressing Brexit.  Parliament continues to debate whether, when, and how to implement Brexit, while the Bundestag has enacted several laws to address how a hard or soft Brexit will affect various aspects of German tax law.  Dr. Andreas Richter of P+P Pöllath + Partners, Berlin and Frankfurt, provides the reader with an overview of the German tax consequences to be anticipated from a U.K. departure from the E.U. – with or without a formal Brexit agreement.

Read More

Anti-Tax Arbitrage the U.S. Way

Anti-Tax Arbitrage the U.S. Way

Hybrid arrangements come in various forms but share a common goal: Each is designed to enhance beneficial tax results by exploiting differences in tax treatment under the laws of two or more countries.  Anti-hybrid rules were adopted as part of the T.C.J.A., which was enacted in the waning days of 2017.  In December 2018, the I.R.S. released proposed regulations that provide guidance on anti-hybrid rules adopted by Congress.  New terms must be understood, including (i) the deduction/no inclusion (“D./N.I.”) rules, (ii) tiered hybrid dividends, (iii) the hybrid deduction account (“H.D.A.”) that addresses timing, and (iv) a principal purposes test denying the benefit of the dividends received deduction.  If final regulations are adopted by June 22, 2019, they will be effective retroactively to the date of enactment of the statute.  In their article, Beate Erwin and Fanny Karaman explain the workings the proposed regulations.

Read More

The Responsible Party – Changes Effective May 2019

The Responsible Party – Changes Effective May 2019

The U.S. Taxpayer Identification Number used by entities is the Employer Identification Number (“E.I.N.”).  To apply for an E.I.N., the entity must identify the “responsible party” who ultimately owns or controls the entity or who exercises ultimate effective control over the entity – in other words, the person who controls, manages, or directs the entity and the disposition of its funds and assets.  In March, the I.R.S. announced that, beginning on May 13, 2019, only individuals with a U.S. Taxpayer Identification Number will be allowed to request an E.I.N.  Moreover, the responsible party must be a natural person – not an entity – unless the applicant is a government entity.  This change will affect many foreign companies entering the U.S. market after the effective date.  Galia Antebi and Nina Krauthamer explain all and speculate on whether revisions to the new procedure should be anticipated.

Read More

State and Local Tax Credit Programs – Businesses May Get What Individuals Cannot

State and Local Tax Credit Programs – Businesses May Get What Individuals Cannot

Since recent Federal tax law changes have capped the state and local tax deduction for individuals to $10,000, many states have been trying to implement solutions to help alleviate the effects of the change.  New York State has introduced two programs to get around the $10,000 limitation:  New Yorkers can make payments to state charitable programs and receive a credit against N.Y. income tax or, alternatively, use an Employer Compensation Expense Program. Nina Krauthamer and Rusudan Shervashidze look at the back and forth between N.Y. and Federal regulators.

Read More

It’s Time for Cayman Shell Entities to Come Out of Their Shells and Show Economic Substance

It’s Time for Cayman Shell Entities to Come Out of Their Shells and Show Economic Substance

·       It is said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  The same can be said about economic substance.  In a step to adopt a standardized definition in the context of business arrangements that are typical for Cayman Islands companies, the country enacted the International Tax Cooperation (Economic Substance) Law, 2018 (“E.S. Law”) on December 27, 2018, and issued supplemental guidance on February 22, 2019.  Neha Rastogi and Galia Antebi address relevant aspects of the new rules, including (i) entities that fall within the ambit of the E.S. Law, (ii) entities that are exempt, (iii) identified business activities under the E.S. Law, and (iv) steps that may be taken to meet the economic substance test.

Read More

New Jersey Provides G.I.L.T.I Guidance

New Jersey Provides G.I.L.T.I Guidance

Federal tax law has introduced a new type of gross income: Global Intangible Low Tax Income (“G.I.L.T.I.”).  The provisions are designed to stop U.S. companies from shifting their profits to offshore jurisdictions, and states are given a choice to incorporate parts of Federal law in one of three ways.  New Jersey has chosen “selective conformity.”  Nina Krauthamer and Rusudan Shervashidze explain what this means for the state and for taxpayers.

Read More

More Permanent Establishments: The Dwindling Preparatory and Auxiliary Activities Exception

More Permanent Establishments: The Dwindling Preparatory and Auxiliary Activities Exception

Nothing is certain in this world, except death and taxes – and even taxes are subject to change.  The ever-expanding definition of a permanent establishment (“P.E.”) and ever diminishing exceptions to a P.E. under the O.E.C.D.’s B.E.P.S. Project has made one thing clear – the restrictions local jurisdictions put on activities by foreign taxpayers to trigger taxation are tightening.  The dwindling preparatory and auxiliary activities exception is a prime example.  Neha Rastogi and Beate Erwin explain.

Read More

The I.R.S. Approach to the Dependent Agent Concept

The I.R.S. Approach to the Dependent Agent Concept

When foreign corporations have certain limited activities in the U.S., a question that arises is whether a taxable presence exists in the U.S. for Federal income tax purposes.  A foreign corporate taxpayer with direct activities or operations in the U.S. is subject to U.S. corporate income tax and branch profits tax if it conducts a U.S. trade or business generating effectively connected income. Recently, the I.R.S. Large Business and International division published an international practice unit (“I.P.U.”) addressing the creation of a P.E. through the activities of a “dependent agent.” Fanny Karaman and Beate Erwin lead the reader through the I.P.U. and explain the four-step process that is used by the I.R.S. to evaluate whether a permanent establishment exists.

Read More

Strategies for Foreign Investment in Indian Start-Ups

Strategies for Foreign Investment in Indian Start-Ups

Foreign investment in Indian high-tech start-ups can yield significant profit opportunities for savvy investors.  During 2018, over 1,000 deals were struck, reflecting $38.3 billion in new investments.  If these investments turn out to be profitable, the tax exposure for the investor will vary with the form of the investment.  Choices of investment vehicles include (i) L.L.P.’s, (ii) Category I, Subcategory I alternative investment funds (“A.I.F.’s”) registered with the Securities Exchange Board, (iii) Category III A.I.F.’s, and (iv) trusts.  Each has unique tax consequences for investors receiving dividends and realizing gains.  Raghu Marwah and Anjali Kukreja of R.N. Marwah & Co L.L.P., New Delhi, explain the entities choices and the resulting tax costs.

Read More

Trust Regulations and Payment Services: Dutch Law in 2019

Trust Regulations and Payment Services: Dutch Law in 2019

The Dutch government has taken steps in recent months to enhance regulatory oversight.  The new Act on the Supervision of Trust Offices 2018 adopts serious best practices for trust companies designed to prevent Dutch entanglement in the next set of Panama Papers.  KYC due diligence must be real.  At the same time, the Second Payment Services Directive (“P.S.D. II”) was transposed into Dutch law.  With customer permission, companies involved in payment service businesses will have greater access to information on spending habits of customers.  This generates a win-win scenario – a miracle for companies engaged in marketing activities and insights for consumers into their spending patterns, enabling them to make better financial decisions.  Lous Vervuurt of Buren N.V., the Hague, explains how the new rules work, including new standards of account security.  

Read More

F.B.A.R.’s — What You Need to Know

F.B.A.R.’s — What You Need to Know

April 15 is almost here, and while most people know this date as the filing deadline for individual tax returns, it is important to another filing requirement: the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (“F.B.A.R.”).  Although the form has been around since the 1970’s, many people continue to profess ignorance of  its existence.  Others are simply confused about the requirements.  A recent Federal case illustrates the perils of failing to file a required F.B.A.R.  Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer explain that penalties are high, and courts are skeptical about claims of ignorance of the law, especially when taxpayers have accumulated several million dollars placed in an offshore account.

Read More

Democrats Turn to Tax Reform to Reduce Wealth Disparity

Democrats Turn to Tax Reform to Reduce Wealth Disparity

The U.S. Federal deficit is expected to reach $1 trillion in 2019.  Meanwhile, a hedge fund billionaire recently purchased a New York City condominium for $238 million, and it is estimated that the top 0.1% possess almost the same amount of wealth as the bottom 90% of all households.  Clearly there are wealth disparities and funding needs in U.S.  When it comes to tax policy, Democrats have traditionally focused on tax relief, including a negative income tax, for poor and working-class families.  Several recent pronouncements and extensive press coverage indicate a new approach, designed to tax the wealthiest individuals at significant rates of tax. Nina Krauthamer explains how current Democratic Party policy makers are planning to even out the distribution of wealth. 

Read More

Who’s Got the B.E.A.T.? Special Treatment for Certain Expenses and Industries

Who’s Got the B.E.A.T.? Special Treatment for Certain Expenses and Industries

Code §59A imposes tax on U.S. corporations with substantial gross receipts when base erosion payments to related entities significantly reduce regular corporate income tax.  The new tax is known as the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (“B.E.A.T.”).  In the second of a two-part series, Rusudan Shervashidze and Stanley C. Ruchelman address (i) the coordination of two sets of limitations on deductions when payments are subject to B.E.A.T. and the Code §163(j) limitation on business interest expense deductions, (ii) the computation of modified taxable income in years when an N.O.L. carryover can reduce taxable income, (iii) application of B.E.A.T. to partnerships and their partners, and (iv) the application of the B.E.A.T. to banks and insurance companies. 

Read More