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The Opportunity Zone Tax Benefit – How Does it Work and Can Foreign Investors Benefit?

The Opportunity Zone Tax Benefit – How Does it Work and Can Foreign Investors Benefit?

State Aid to entice investment and development in a specific region is bad in Europe but encouraged in the U.S. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act added an important new provision that is expected to unlock unrealized gains and defer the tax on the gain when it is invested in active operating businesses in distressed areas designated as “Opportunity Zones.” The tax is deferred until the targeted investment is sold, or until 2026 at the latest. A progressive partial step-up in basis is also granted if the investment is held for a minimum of five years. The entire appreciation in value of the new targeted investment is excluded from tax if held for ten years. In a plain English primer, Galia Antebi and Nina Krauthamer explain the concept and the necessary implementation steps and consider whether the new provision can eliminate F.I.R.P.T.A. tax for foreign investors.

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F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

When F.A.T.C.A. was adopted in 2010, the hoopla from the U.S. Senate promoted the idea that the I.R.S. would become invincible in rooting out recalcitrant Americans not wanting to pay tax and the financial institutions willing to assist them. In principle, information in U.S. tax returns could be compared with F.A.T.C.A. reporting by foreign financial institutions to identify which taxpayers remained offside and which banks had insufficient reporting systems. A recent report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (“T.I.G.T.A.”) concluded that after spending nearly $380 million, the I.R.S. is still not prepared to enforce F.A.T.C.A. compliance. In their article, Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer summarize the principal shortfalls and possible solutions identified by T.I.G.T.A. and which suggested action plans the I.R.S. will contemplate.

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Insights Vol. 5 No. 8: Updates & Other Tidbits

Insights Vol. 5 No. 8: Updates & Other Tidbits

This month, Rusudan Shervashidze, Neha Rastogi, and Nina Krauthamer look at several interesting updates and tidbits, including (i) potential tax reasons for Cristiano Ronaldo’s move to Italy, (ii) a law suit brought by high-tax states against the U.S. Federal government in connection with the T.C.J.A. limitations on deductions for state and local taxes, (iii) the finding of the European Commission that the aid given to McDonalds by the Luxembourg government did not constitute illegal State Aid, and (iv) a successful F.A.T.C.A. prosecution against a former executive of Loyal Bank Ltd.

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Have You Inherited a P.F.I.C.? – What it Means to Be a U.S. Beneficiary

Have You Inherited a P.F.I.C.? – What it Means to Be a U.S. Beneficiary

In today’s global environment, it is not surprising to find that a beneficiary of a foreign estate or trust is living in the U.S. An interest in a foreign trust can be problematic for the beneficiary if the foreign trust invests through a foreign “blocker” corporation that holds passive assets (such as publicly traded stocks and securities) or a foreign mutual fund. These companies can stumble into P.F.I.C. categorization for U.S. tax purposes, which yields sub-optimal tax consequences for the U.S. beneficiary. Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer break down the U.S. tax rules that make a foreign corporation a P.F.I.C., the various ways in which a U.S. investor in a P.F.I.C. will be taxed, and the reporting obligations that are imposed on the U.S. investor in a P.F.I.C.

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Insights Vol. 5 No. 6: Updates & Other Tidbits

Insights Vol. 5 No. 6: Updates & Other Tidbits

This month, Neha Rastogi and Nina Krauthamer look at several interesting updates and tidbits, including (i) an I.R.S. notice that addresses legislative workarounds to limitations on deductions for state and local tax payments effective in 2018, (ii) new rules under Code §83(i), which allow a qualified employee to defer income attributable to stock received in connection with the exercise of an option or the settlement of a restricted stock unit (“R.S.U.”), and (iii) a call for guidance regarding cryptocurrency accounting.

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