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Code §962 Election: One or Two Levels of Taxation?

Code §962 Election: One or Two Levels of Taxation?

Code §962 allows an Individual U.S. Shareholder to apply corporate tax rates and offers relief from double taxation in certain situations, but where new provisions of the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act (“T.C.J.A.”) are involved, the application is murky. The T.C.J.A. introduced two provisions designed to limit the scope of deferral for the earnings of foreign subsidiaries operating abroad. One provision is the one-time deemed repatriation tax regime of Code §965, which looks backward to tax what had been permanently deferred earnings. The other provision is the global intangible low taxed income (“G.I.L.T.I.”) regime, which eliminates most deferral on a go-forward basis. Each provision limits deferral but, at the same time, imposes relatively benign tax on U.S.-based multinationals. Interestingly, it seems that it was only in the last days of the legislative process that Congress became aware that owner-managed businesses also operate abroad. While the provisions clearly apply to corporations, Congress may or may not have provided a benefit for the U.S. individuals who own of these companies. Sound cryptic? Fanny Karaman and Nina Krauthamer explain all.

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How to Handle Dual Residents: The I.R.S. View on Treaty Tie-Breaker Rules

How to Handle Dual Residents: The I.R.S. View on Treaty Tie-Breaker Rules

The first step in advising a foreign individual who is neither a U.S. citizen nor a green card holder on U.S. income tax laws is to determine the person's residence for income tax purposes. But what is to be done when the individual is resident in multiple jurisdictions? A recent LB&I International Practice Unit offers a quick understanding of the tax issues I.R.S. examiners raise when dealing with individuals who are dual residents for tax purposes. Virtually all income tax treaties entered into by the U.S. contain a tiebreaker rule under which the exclusive residence of an individual is determined for purposes of applying the income tax treaty. Fanny Karaman and Beate Erwin explain how these rules are applied. One point to remember is that the tiebreaker test for treaty residence purposes does not affect an individual's obligation to file an F.B.A.R. form.

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Qualified Business Income – Are You Eligible for a 20% Deduction? Part II: Additional Guidance

Qualified Business Income – Are You Eligible for a 20% Deduction? Part II: Additional Guidance

In August, the I.R.S. issued much-awaited proposed regulations under the new Code §199A covering Qualified Business Income (“Q.B.I”). This provision of recently enacted U.S. tax law allows entrepreneurial individuals to claim a 20% deduction on taxable business profits of a sole proprietorship, partnership, L.L.C. or S-corporation. Galia Antebi, Nina Krauthamer, and Fanny Karaman ask and answer the pertinent questions: Who may benefit? How do the rules addressing R.E.I.T.’s and publicly traded partnerships (“P.T.P.’s”) affect Q.B.I when a net negative result is reported by the R.E.I.T. and the P.T.P.? When is an individual’s income effectively connected to a trade or business and when is the. income a form of disguised salary for which no deduction is allowed? What is a specified trade or business (“S.S.T.B.”)  for which the resulting income cannot benefit from the Q.B.I. deduction? How does the de minimis rule work under which a limited Q.B.I. deduction is allowed S.S.T.B. income does not exceed a specified ceiling? How does the ceiling based on W-2 wages work when calculating the Q.B.I. deduction? 

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Hybrid Mismatches: Where U.S. Tax Law and A.T.A.D. Meet

Hybrid Mismatches: Where U.S. Tax Law and A.T.A.D. Meet

When U.S. tax planners attend foreign conferences, it is not uncommon to hear pointed barbs that the U.S. is an outlier when it comes to rules enforcing “best practices” on global business transactions. However, when it comes to reverse hybrids and hybrid mismatches, the rules are not all that different on both sides of the Atlantic. Fanny Karaman and Beate Erwin compare approaches taken by ATAD 2 with U.S. tax law after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

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Blockchain 101

Blockchain 101

Blockchain has been in the spotlight since early 2017, mostly due to the 2017 surge in cryptocurrency values and the rise of initial coin offerings (“I.C.O.’s”). Many legal advisors have clients who use or wish to use blockchain in their businesses, and yet, the actual technology is often not discussed in the legal field. In a series of Q&A’s, Fanny Karaman and Galia Antebi explain the rationale behind blockchain technology and reasons for its reliability. Because blockchain is a decentralized system with inherent proof of work built into the program, it can eliminate the need for intermediaries, such as banks, lawyers, and brokers. Advisers should be aware of the benefits of the technology, as well as its potential for disrupting the legal landscape.

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