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2020 Will Mark the End of an Era: Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Accepted

2020 Will Mark the End of an Era: Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Accepted

On May 19, 2019, Swiss Federal and Genevan cantonal voters accepted proposed corporate tax reforms by a large majority.  As explained by Thierry Boitelle and Aliasghar Kanani of Bonnard Lawson Geneva, Switzerland will abolish its widely criticized cantonal special tax regimes and certain Federal regimes.  At the same time, Switzerland and the cantons will introduce generally applicable reduced and attractive corporate income tax rates and several new special regimes, meeting current international standards and requirements.  These changes will be effective as of 2020.

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Proposed F.D.I.I. Regulations: Deductions, Sales, and Services

Proposed F.D.I.I. Regulations: Deductions, Sales, and Services

The foreign derived intangible income (“F.D.I.I.”) regime allows for a reduced rate of corporate tax rate on hypothetical intangible income used in a U.S. business to exploit foreign markets.  Many implementation issues that were left open when the provision was enacted have been addressed in proposed I.R.S. proposed regulations issued early March.  In their article, Fanny Karaman and Beate Erwin explain (i) which taxpayers benefit from the regime, (ii) the way deductions are taken into account, (iii) whether the deduction is always available when a U.S. corporation sells on a foreign market, (iv) the way in which foreign use of sales or services is established, and (v) the way in which related-party transactions can qualify as F.D.D.E.I. sales or services.

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Revised Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Will Keep Switzerland a Top Corporate Location

Revised Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Will Keep Switzerland a Top Corporate Location

Beginning in 2015, Switzerland has struggled over the adoption of a tax system that is consistent with B.E.P.S. Many different stakeholders are involved, ranging from the Swiss Federal government to the cantons, various political parties, and the E.U. At last, a version of tax reform has been adopted by the Swiss Federal National Assembly. Known as the Federal Act on Tax Reform and A.H.V. Financing ("T.R.A.F."), it contains provisions designed to please all participants while maintaining Switzerland's global reputation as an attractive jurisdiction for multinational enterprises. Danielle Wenger and Manuel Vogler of Prager Dreifuss AG, Zurich, guide the reader through the various iterations of the reform and the provisions of the T.R.A.F.

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Dutch Corporate Tax Reform: Dividend Tax Remains, A.T.A.D. Arrives, and Tax Rates Drop

Dutch Corporate Tax Reform: Dividend Tax Remains, A.T.A.D. Arrives, and Tax Rates Drop

Across the globe, the landscape for international tax is in a constant state of change. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Netherlands. On the third Tuesday of September, a repeal of the dividend withholding tax was announced. Within a month, it was withdrawn. Paul Kraan, a partner of Van Campen Liem in Amsterdam, discusses the remaining tax proposals presented by the Dutch government on the eve of the third Tuesday of September. These include provisions related to A.T.A.D. 1, such as G.A.A.R., an exit tax for corporations, a C.F.C. anti-abuse rule, and a cap on the deductibility of net interest expense.  Also discussed is an existing unilateral exemption from withholding tax on cross-border dividend payments in (i) the context of an income tax treaty and (ii) the presence of economic substance for the direct or indirect shareholder. This exemption is likely to remain in the law.

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Insights Vol. 5 No. 3: Updates & Other Tidbits

Insights Vol. 5 No. 3: Updates & Other Tidbits

This month, Tomi Oguntunde, Sheryl Shah, and Nina Krauthamer look briefly at four recent developments in international tax: (i) the E.U. counteroffensive to U.S. tax reform involving stricter tax rules, (ii) the amendment of Form 1023-EZ, which is a streamlined application for non-profit entities applying for tax exempt status, (iii) Spain’s crackdown on celebrities attempting to evade tax, and (iv) Luxembourg’s continued pushback against the Amazon State Aid case.

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