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F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

F.A.T.C.A. – Where Do We Stand Today?

When F.A.T.C.A. was adopted in 2010, the hoopla from the U.S. Senate promoted the idea that the I.R.S. would become invincible in rooting out recalcitrant Americans not wanting to pay tax and the financial institutions willing to assist them. In principle, information in U.S. tax returns could be compared with F.A.T.C.A. reporting by foreign financial institutions to identify which taxpayers remained offside and which banks had insufficient reporting systems. A recent report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (“T.I.G.T.A.”) concluded that after spending nearly $380 million, the I.R.S. is still not prepared to enforce F.A.T.C.A. compliance. In their article, Rusudan Shervashidze and Nina Krauthamer summarize the principal shortfalls and possible solutions identified by T.I.G.T.A. and which suggested action plans the I.R.S. will contemplate.

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U.K. Requirement to Correct

U.K. Requirement to Correct

The “Requirement to Correct” (“R.T.C.”) rules for offshore tax affairs in the U.K. threaten steep penalties if noncompliant taxpayers at April 5, 2017, do not take action to correct the relevant noncompliance by September 30, 2018. In a detailed look at the R.T.C. rules, Gary Ashford of Harbottle & Lewis L.L.P., London, explains the ins and outs of the provisions, including (i) the definition of offshore noncompliance, (ii) covered taxes, (iii) penalties, (iv) the reasonable cause defense, (v) disqualified advice that cannot be reasonable cause, (v) the method that must be followed to implement a valid correction, (vi) the statute of limitations, and (vi) recent guidance from H.M.R.C. regarding last minute notifications by noncompliant taxpayers. The final date for completing a correction is December 29, 2018.

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I.R.S. Announces Six Compliance Campaign

I.R.S. Announces Six Compliance Campaign

The I.R.S. Large Business and International division ("LB&I") recently announced compliance campaigns that are principally directed at compliance in cross-border fact patterns.  Included are campaigns to address (i) non-compliance with respect to Form 3520, (ii) compliance issues related to Form 1042, (iii) nonresident, non-citizen individuals inappropriately claiming tax treaty exemptions, (iv) nonresident, non-citizen individuals inappropriately claiming itemized deductions on tax returns, and (v) inappropriate credits claimed by nonresident, non-citizen individuals. Elizabeth V. Zanet looks into the various campaigns and places into context the effect on individuals.

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Insights Vol. 4 No. 11: Updates & Other Tidbits

Insights Vol. 4 No. 11: Updates & Other Tidbits

This month, Sheryl Shah and Nina Krauthamer look briefly at two I.R.S. actions: (i) the roll out of a long-awaited passport denial program and (ii) the end of favorable rulings on certain worthless stock deductions and spinoffs.

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Employment Tax Basics and Paths to Compliance

Employment Tax Basics and Paths to Compliance

 When a company expands across a border, it faces a complex web of employment-related taxes.  Penalties for failure to properly comply with these rules can be severe.  Fanny Karaman looks at the U.S. rules that are applicable to the payment of wages and bonuses, the penalties that can be imposed on compliance failures, and the procedures that are available to cure errors.  The rules are not straightforward, guidance is often minimal, and an experienced advisor is extremely valuable.

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