HIDE

Other Publications

Insights

Publications

I.R.S. Pushes to Ease Implementation of Country-by-Country Reporting for U.S. M.N.E.’s

I.R.S. Pushes to Ease Implementation of Country-by-Country Reporting for U.S. M.N.E.’s

It is widely known that the U.S. is following its own path towards international tax compliance.  It has not signed onto the O.E.C.D.’s Multilateral Competent Authority Agreement on the Exchange of Country-by-Country Reports; it does not participate in the Common Reporting Standard; and it did not sign the Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent B.E.P.S.  Nonetheless, at the request of U.S. multinationals, the I.R.S. has adopted domestic income tax regulations on country-by-country (“CbC”) reporting.  In May, the I.R.S. confirmed the first bilateral competent authority agreement regarding CbC reporting was signed with the Netherlands.  That agreement has now been followed by agreements with Canada, Denmark, Guernsey, Iceland, Ireland, Korea, Latvia, New Zealand, Norway, Slovakia, and South Africa.  Galia Antebi and Kenneth Lobo delve into the U.S. rules and forms for CbC reports.

Read More

Foreign Tax Credit May Not Be Available for Gains Derived Outside the U.S.

Foreign Tax Credit May Not Be Available for Gains Derived Outside the U.S.

Merely because a foreign country imposes an income tax and the tax is creditable does not mean that effective relief from double taxation is available.  The U.S. retains the first right to tax income and gains that are domestic in character, and the income or gain on which the foreign tax is imposed must be categorized as foreign for relief to be provided.  Kenneth Lobo and Galia Antebi focus on this issue and advise that advance planning will be required.

Read More

Code §163(J) – Ignoring U.S. Thin Capitalization Rules May Leave Tax Advisors Thinly Prepared for Audits

Code §163(J) – Ignoring U.S. Thin Capitalization Rules May Leave Tax Advisors Thinly Prepared for Audits

B.E.P.S. Action 4 focuses on the need to address base erosion and profit shifting using deductible payments, such as interest, that can give rise to double nontaxation in inbound and outbound investment scenarios. The U.S. addressed this problem many years ago with Code §163(j).  In light of recent I.R.S. guidance providing a step-by-step plan to assist auditors when analyzing interest payments, non-U.S. practitioners should be aware of the thin capitalization debt rules when planning for multinational structures.  Kenneth Lobo and Beate Erwin explain how the provision works in general and in several illustrative fact patterns. 

Read More

Valuation – More Art than Science

Valuation – More Art than Science

In a recent case, the Tax Court was asked to evaluate two Old Masters paintings from the 17th century.  Sotheby’s provided the valuation for estate tax purposes on a gratuitous basis.  The appraised value totaled $600,000 for the two works.  The estate retained the same auction house to sell one of the paintings.  The sale price at auction was $2.1 million before buyer’s premium, and the auction took place within 34 months of the issuance of the appraisal report.  Kenneth Lobo and Nina Krauthamer explain why the court had no difficulty finding that the estate’s expert was not independent and that the subsequent sale was relevant

Read More

Cross-Border Complexities: What You Need to Know Before Your Non-U.S. Client Invests in the U.S.

Cross-Border Complexities: What You Need to Know Before Your Non-U.S. Client Invests in the U.S.

When foreign tax counsel advises a client on a personal investment in the U.S., it is common for a U.S. tax adviser to comment on the scope of U.S. income, gift, and estate taxes.  Sometimes the investment is made through a trust and other times it is made directly.  In their article, Kenneth Lobo and Fanny Karaman answer questions raised in the context of fact patterns often used.

Read More