HIDE

Other Publications

Insights

Publications

C.J.E.U. Judgments on Danish Beneficial Ownership Cases

C.J.E.U. Judgments on Danish Beneficial Ownership Cases

Earlier this year, the C.J.E.U. released two judgments dealing with the interpretation of the Parent-Subsidiary Directive (“P.S.D.”) and the Interest & Royalties Directive in the E.U.  In each case, a structure was meticulously built to comply with national and E.U. law allowing global investors to bring funds to the E.U. in return for dividends and interest that were subject to little or no national tax in any E.U. country.  Nothing in the structure was unique, other than the reticence of the Danish tax authorities to grant withholding tax exemptions.  To the surprise of many, the C.J.E.U. looked at the structure and concluded that it lacked economic substance and should be disregarded by reason of a general E.U. anti-abuse principal.  The internal E.U. recipients of the dividend and interest payments were not considered to be the beneficial owners of the income.  Almost 50 years after the Aiken Industries case in the U.S. Tax Court and 25 years after the anti-conduit regulations were adopted by the I.R.S., European substance-over-form rules have now been adopted by judicial fiat.  Thierry Lesage and Adnand Sulejmani of Arendt & Medernach SA, Luxembourg, meticulously explain the reasoning of the court and suggest that the court may have erred by conflating anti-abuse rules with beneficial ownership concepts.

Read More
/Source

Employers in the Netherlands: Prepare for Changes to Labor and Dismissal Laws In 2020

Employers in the Netherlands: Prepare for Changes to Labor and Dismissal Laws In 2020

In May, the Dutch Senate adopted the Labor Market in Balance Act designed to reduce the gap in legal protection and financial compensation between employment arrangements under fixed-term contracts and employment arrangements with indefinite term. The act provides greater rights on termination and, as a result, is unpopular with employers. It also aims to resolve some of the negative effects of an earlier amendment to the law that has been the subject of relentless criticism. Rachida el Johari and Madeleine Molster of Sagiure Legal, Amsterdam, explain the way Dutch labor law will affect termination rights for employees and suggest a path forward for management. This is another area of E.U. law in which companies will need to re-educate executives on proper patterns of behavior.

Read More

India and the Digital Economy – The Emerging P.E. and Attribution Issues

India and the Digital Economy – The Emerging P.E. and Attribution Issues

The exponential expansion of information and communication technology has made it possible for businesses to be conducted in ways that did not exist 15 years ago.  It has given rise to new business models that rely almost exclusively on digital and telecommunication networks, do not require physical presence, and derive substantial value from data collected and transmitted through digital networks.  So how and where should these companies be taxed?  Sunil Agarwal, an advocate and senior tax partner of AZB & Partners New Delhi, evaluates proposals already enacted in India and the U.K. and those under consideration at the level of the European Commission and E.U. member countries Italy, France, and Austria.  Should the digital tax be a consumption tax passed on to the final consumer or a minimum income tax based on global profits or substantial economic presence?  At this point, consensus does not exist.

Read More

2020 Will Mark the End of an Era: Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Accepted

2020 Will Mark the End of an Era: Swiss Corporate Tax Reform Accepted

On May 19, 2019, Swiss Federal and Genevan cantonal voters accepted proposed corporate tax reforms by a large majority.  As explained by Thierry Boitelle and Aliasghar Kanani of Bonnard Lawson Geneva, Switzerland will abolish its widely criticized cantonal special tax regimes and certain Federal regimes.  At the same time, Switzerland and the cantons will introduce generally applicable reduced and attractive corporate income tax rates and several new special regimes, meeting current international standards and requirements.  These changes will be effective as of 2020.

Read More

Reflections on My 66 Years in Public Accounting

Reflections on My 66 Years in Public Accounting

Periodically in life, one comes across an individual who is best described as follows:  He or she “gets it.”  Difficult to describe analytically, in the tax world, the term means that (i) in solving technical problems, the person focuses the material, leaving the immaterial to others; (ii) in making decisions, the person can separate the important from the unimportant; and (iii) in advising others on the impact of a new accounting rule or provision of tax law, the person can digest the complex and explain it in a series of simple sentences.  Often, the individual is self-effacing.  Arthur J. Radin was all of the above.  He passed away in April.  In his memory, we are pleased to republish an article written for the CPA Journal describing the way professional accounting changed during his 60-year career and, more importantly, the way the world changed.  Arthur will be missed.

Read More